Categories EntertainmentPosted on

Mother’s Ruin: A Cabaret About Gin at Underbelly Festival

As London continues its complex love affair with gin, SEEN is fascinated to hear that a cabaret show on that very subject is heading our way…

Whet your appetite in a thoroughly gin-soaked way with Mother’s Ruin: A Cabaret About Gin, performed by Australia’s hottest cabaret stars and served with Australia’s finest gin at the Underbelly Festival.

Equal parts historical and “hysterical”, this darkly comic ode to gin is a raucous journey told through tales of women, love, secrets and… gin. Two of Australia’s hottest stars, Maeve Marsden and Libby Wood, accompanied by Australian cabaret legend Tom Dickins, ignite the stage with stunning vocals and quick wit as they take an intoxicating stroll through the history of one of the world’s favourite tipples.

From the streets of London to the Australian bush, via colonial India, New York speakeasies and the jungles of Peru, the mythology and propaganda around gin has been relentlessly used to subjugate women, build misnomers on miscarriage and hammer home the message of “hysteria”.

Marsden and Wood are long-time collaborators, evident in their flawless harmonies and natural demeanour, described as “buxom and bodacious” (InDaily). Their UK tour sees them join forces with Tom Dickins as their Pianoman, who has recorded and toured with Amanda Palmer, co-written with Neil Gaiman, and shared the stage with the likes of Tim Minchin, Paul Kelly and Margaret Cho.

With a generous splash of stunning music, a dash of theatricality and a twist of feminist theory, Mother’s Ruin is a deliciously contemporary cabaret cocktail. The production comes to London for one performance only, and has a strong record of selling out in similar Spiegeltents around the world. Bookings highly recommended.

Date: 30th of August ONLY
Time: 9.30pm (60 minutes)
Cost: from £17.50.

www.underbellyfestival.com

Underbelly Festival
Southbank
Belvedere Road Coach Park
London
SE1 8XX

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