Categories ArtPosted on

Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait, at the Jewish Museum

SEEN was very absorbed in this personal and poignant exhibition about the life and times of the late singer, whose distinct presence and talent is synonymous with the Camden area and the Jewish presence in North London. Set firmly within the context of her family (particularly formidable matriarch Grandma Cynthia) it was moving and powerful to view an exhibition rooted in family memorabilia. It’s intimate, unshowy and very much celebrates Amy Winehouse as a person in her right as well as that of performer, daughter, and sister. Most poignantly (for SEEN at least) were the two empty birdcages (Amy’s own) that seemed rich with metaphor for the singer’s life. Now the public has a real chance to connect with Amy the person, rather than Amy the star, who has been paraded enough for public consumption.

A young Amy outside her Nan’s flat in Southgate Photographer unknown © The Winehouse Family
A young Amy outside her Nan’s flat in Southgate Photographer unknown © The Winehouse Family

SEEN can remember seeing footage of Amy Winehouse at Glastonbury at the depth of her addictive illness and thinking how scared she looked. Yet here she is in footage from her time at Sylvia Young Stage School, totally owning the stage, a star in the making as her essay to enter the school clearly displays. Her dresses, guitar, shoes, even lanyards (obsessively collected by the star on her tours) and photos of the family make a fascinating companion piece to the Asif Kapadia documentary if you haven’t seen it. The glimpses into the Winehouse siblings’ lives (particularly brother Alex) were also illuminating.

Amy Winehouse by Bambi, Bayham Street, Camden © Jewish Museum London
Amy Winehouse by Bambi, Bayham Street, Camden © Jewish Museum London
Atmosphere by Pegasus, Parkway, Camden © Jewish Museum London
Atmosphere by Pegasus, Parkway, Camden © Jewish Museum London
Captain Kris and Amara Por Dios, Nemesis Tattoo
Captain Kris and Amara Por Dios, Nemesis Tattoo

You should also check out the art trail; there are some top portraits of Amy in her beloved Camden and in free exhibition by Chicago-born artist, Pegasus, in the museum. SEEN was lucky enough to talk to the artist who was a friend of the late singer. Her death led to him creating the famous portrait of her with wings that became a destination for grieving fans. Pegasus has created a series of four portraits in which he cleverly uses colour to create a different mood for each one. The red heart to denote passion and happiness; the blue to denote sadness; the pink for girlishness and innocence and a final teal heart which is quite ambiguous, to denote that part of the late singer that she never really knew herself, perhaps. SEEN thought them outstanding, on a par with the Marlene Dumas portrait of Amy currently in the National Portrait Gallery. The lyrics to ‘Love is a Losing Game’ accompany the series, contextualising the singer’s yearning for love and the destructive part it played in her life. Yet Pegasus’s paintings are essentially redemptive in that they give a glimmer of hope, something that imbued Amy Winehouse’s life with possibility as it should do for all of us.

Installation shot: festival passes and gig tickets
Installation shot: festival passes and gig tickets
Installation shot: Dress by Luella Bartley worn by Amy at Glastonbury 2008
Installation shot: Dress by Luella Bartley worn by Amy at Glastonbury 2008
Pegasus Love Is A Losing Game © Jewish Museum London.
Pegasus Love Is A Losing Game © Jewish Museum London.
Pegasus Love Is A Losing Game © Jon Holloway
Pegasus Love Is A Losing Game © Jon Holloway

The exhibition will be travelling soon so see it while you can. It’s the sort of exhibition that London does best: personal, meaningful and, uniquely, sets its subject within her community. Unmissable.

www.jewishmuseum.org.uk

Jewish Museum
Raymond Burton House
129-131 Albert Street
London
NW1 7NB

Credits

Photo credit: Mark Okoh Camera Press London

Seen this week

Categories ArtPosted on

House of Vans London X Studio PSK: Let There be Light

One of SEEN’s favourite venues is House of Vans in Waterloo, the skate park and cultural space bar none. We hear that until 17th December 2017 House of Vans London has partnered with Studio PSK, award-winning London-based design and creative studio, to transform Tunnel 1 into a shifting, multicoloured lighting installation open to the public.

Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

aqua kyoto: A Christmas Alternative

If the thought of Christmas with its attendant indulgences makes you long for the cuisines of other countries, then have a look at the winter menus on offer from aqua kyoto. A feast for the eyes as well as the stomach they have a lunch menu offering – essentially elevated bento boxes, which are as …

Categories DesignPosted on

Dinny Hall: A Shining Star

SEEN had the privilege recently, of hearing iconic jeweller Dinny Hall speak about her life and career in jewellery and design. She started off in the seventies when jewellery didn’t have the profile it has now, so in that sense she was very much a pioneer. She hung out with the cool musicians of the …