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Ordinary and Heroic: London Housing Scheme is up for the Mies Van Der Rohe Award

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Alison Brooks, who designed The Smile (showcased during the London Design Festival 2016) is now a finalist in this year’s Mies Van Der Rohe Award for her housing scheme, Ely Court. This is a 43-dwelling mixed-tenure scheme for the South Kilburn Estate Regeneration Masterplan on behalf of Brent Council.

Stephen Bates, architect and Chairman of the Jury said: “Our instincts could be summed up by the words of Peter Smithson: ‘things need to be ordinary and heroic at the same time’. We were looking for an ordinariness whose understated lyricism is full of potential”.

The jury must decide between five finalists: Alison Brooks for Ely Court; Lundgaard and Tranberg Architects’ church building in Ribe, that shelters 12th century ruins; NL Architects and XVW Architectuur’s Amsterdam housing block; BBGK’s Architektci’s Warsaw museum; and French practice Rudy Ricciotti’s memorial in Rivesaltes.

The Mies Van Der Rohe prize goes to the best building constructed in the previous two years by a European architect. The jury will now visit all five buildings to make their difficult final decision. The winner will receive £51,000 and be celebrated in a ceremony at the Mies Van Der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona in May 2017.

deFlat Kleiburg, Amsterdam, by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur
deFlat Kleiburg, Amsterdam, by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur
Ely Court, London, by Alison Brooks Architects
Ely Court, London, by Alison Brooks Architects
Kannikegården, Ribe, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
Kannikegården, Ribe, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
Katyn Museum, Warsaw, by BBGK Architekci
Katyn Museum, Warsaw, by BBGK Architekci
Rivesaltes Memorial Museum, Rivesaltes/Ribesaltes, by Rudy Ricciotti
Rivesaltes Memorial Museum, Rivesaltes/Ribesaltes, by Rudy Ricciotti

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