Categories ArchitecturePosted on

Ordinary and Heroic: London Housing Scheme is up for the Mies Van Der Rohe Award

seen-london

Alison Brooks, who designed The Smile (showcased during the London Design Festival 2016) is now a finalist in this year’s Mies Van Der Rohe Award for her housing scheme, Ely Court. This is a 43-dwelling mixed-tenure scheme for the South Kilburn Estate Regeneration Masterplan on behalf of Brent Council.

Stephen Bates, architect and Chairman of the Jury said: “Our instincts could be summed up by the words of Peter Smithson: ‘things need to be ordinary and heroic at the same time’. We were looking for an ordinariness whose understated lyricism is full of potential”.

The jury must decide between five finalists: Alison Brooks for Ely Court; Lundgaard and Tranberg Architects’ church building in Ribe, that shelters 12th century ruins; NL Architects and XVW Architectuur’s Amsterdam housing block; BBGK’s Architektci’s Warsaw museum; and French practice Rudy Ricciotti’s memorial in Rivesaltes.

The Mies Van Der Rohe prize goes to the best building constructed in the previous two years by a European architect. The jury will now visit all five buildings to make their difficult final decision. The winner will receive £51,000 and be celebrated in a ceremony at the Mies Van Der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona in May 2017.

deFlat Kleiburg, Amsterdam, by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur
deFlat Kleiburg, Amsterdam, by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur
Ely Court, London, by Alison Brooks Architects
Ely Court, London, by Alison Brooks Architects
Kannikegården, Ribe, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
Kannikegården, Ribe, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
Katyn Museum, Warsaw, by BBGK Architekci
Katyn Museum, Warsaw, by BBGK Architekci
Rivesaltes Memorial Museum, Rivesaltes/Ribesaltes, by Rudy Ricciotti
Rivesaltes Memorial Museum, Rivesaltes/Ribesaltes, by Rudy Ricciotti

Seen this week

Categories FashionPosted on

MO-GA: Perfectly Imperfect

As the Sun shines on Earth, so MO-GA’s gender-fluid designs grace the bodies of everyone, rejoicing in ambiguity. Multiple sleeves and feathers recall the animal kingdom in all its glorious diversity; it’s a new aesthetic.

Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

Cocktails at the General Store

SEEN is tireless in her cocktail research, and very much enjoyed travelling to Highbury last week to try The General Store’s new summer cocktail menu and to check out the new interior. She was delighted to sample a Honey Mimosa, very sweet and fruity and just the ticket after a hot journey. It was, as its name suggests, a Mimosa with just a touch of honey.

Categories ArtPosted on

Canaletto: A Drawing Workshop with Alexandra Blum

SEEN has long been an admirer of Alexandra Blum’s liminal and apocalyptic renderings of London’s urban spaces, in which the capital seems ever-changing. It is the artist’s job to capture not only space but the passage of time itself.

Categories MusicPosted on

Rock the Strand is Back Thursday 27th July

One of SEEN’s favourite live music events, Rock the Strand, returns to Strand Palace Hotel on Thursday 27th July for a summer showcase featuring a stellar line-up of talented artists. Curated by industry mogul Tony Moore, Rock the Strand is a free music night that showcases an eclectic range of genres from indie alt-folk to country from emerging new talent and established acts, highlighting the UK’s varied and diverse musical landscape.

Categories GuidePosted on

Love Hunt at the British Museum

SEEN had the pleasure (pun intended) of being invited to a ‘Love Hunt’ at the British Museum. The museum, founded in 1753, is committed to preserving art, culture and history, and has collected around 8 million objects. These artefacts come from every corner of the world, revealing a fragment of many significant moments in time, from Mesopotamia to the Vikings; from the Inuits to the Indians. So, when one embarks on a visit to the world famous British Museum, where does one start?