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Human Rights Watch Film Festival London 2017

SEEN is excited to announce that the Human Rights Watch Film Festival, held in London between 6th – 17th March in partnership with the Barbican, Picturehouse Central and British Museum, will be presenting 16 documentaries that tap into some of the most pressing issues facing the world right now.

Raoul Peck’s Oscar nominated film I Am Not Your Negro, an up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, will be opening the festival on 9th March at Picturehouse Central, followed by a panel discussion chaired by writer and broadcaster Gaylene Gould. The festival will close on 17th March at the Barbican with the IDFA winner for Best Documentary Nowhere To Hide, which explores the reality of life for people seeking refuge from conflict and terror.

I-am-Not-Your-Negro-Featured
I Am Not Your Negro
Nowhere to Hide
Nowhere to Hide

The Human Rights Watch fund-raising Benefit Gala on 6th March at the British Museum will deal with the integrity of journalism with the award-winning filmmaker Fred Peabody’s All Governments Lie, followed by an on-stage discussion. Peabody explores the life and legacy of the godfather of independent journalism, I. F. Stone, and examines how Stone’s successors – among them the filmmaker Michael Moore, the Democracy Now founder Amy Goodman, The Intercept founders Glenn Greenwald and Jeremy Scahill, and Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone – are exposing government and corporate deception, just as Stone did decades ago.

All Governments Lie
All Governments Lie

Four titles, including the closing night film, connect directly to the current refugee crises that dominate international politics: the world premiere by British sisters Sophia and Georgia Scott of Lost in Lebanon, which follows four Syrians whose lives become increasingly desperate due to the devastating consequences of new visa laws implemented by the Lebanese government; The Good Postman by Tonislav Hristov about Ivan, who is running for mayor and campaigning to bring life to his aging and increasingly deserted Bulgarian village, by welcoming refugees and their families to settle there; and Shimon Dotan’s The Settlers, on the world of Jewish settlers in the occupied West Bank.

Lost in Lebanon
Lost in Lebanon
The Good Postman
The Good Postman
The Settlers
The Settlers

The programme another world premiere, Complicit, which follows factory workers harmed by exposure to chemicals in their work as they fight the Chinese electronics giant Foxconn (who supply Apple & Samsung).

Complicit
Complicit

Elsewhere, other docs include stories of individual and collective activism, whether a teenager from Hong Kong, internet sleuths, the indigenous Mayan population in Guatemala, elderly women revealing historic sexual exploitation, a female squash player from Pakistan and ‘the Egyptian Jon Stewart’.

It’s worth highlighting that 7 out of the 18 films screening this year are made by women, and that Maria Toorpakai, who became Pakistan’s finest woman squash player despite Taliban death threats, will attend the screening of Girl Unbound. As ever, the festival will invite filmmakers, and in some instances, film subjects to attend for extended Q&As and panels.

Girl Unbound
Girl Unbound

The full programme can be checked here.

Barbican
Cinema 1
Level 2
Silk St
London
EC2Y 8DS

Barbican
Cinemas 2 & 3
Beech Street
London
EC2Y 8AE
Box office: 0207 638 8891
barbican.org.uk

British Museum
Great Russell Street
London
WC1B 3DG
Tel: 0207 323 8299
www.britishmuseum.org

Picturehouse Central
Corner of Great Windmill Street and Shaftesbury Avenue
Piccadilly,
London
W1D 7DH
Tel: 0871 902 5755
picturehouses.com

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Categories FashionPosted on

Burberry: London Fashion Week

Leave it to Christopher Bailey, President and Chief Creative Officer of British luxury brand Burberry to have his finger on the pulse of the very latest in fashion. He’s helped transform Burberry’s fortunes since 2001, establishing it as a cutting-edge brand for the 21st century, initiating ground-breaking fashion innovations.