Categories ArtPosted on

José Yaque’s Mother Earth at David Gill Gallery

“Tierra Madre” is the first London solo exhibition by the Cuban artist José Yaque. The various works, inspired by, and made specifically for, David Gill Gallery, will be on show from 3rd February until 5th March 2017 in the Gallery’s Mayfair space.

Lapislázuli I, 2016. (255x190cm)
Lapislázuli I, 2016. (255x190cm)

José Yaque’s debut UK show follows a residency in London last October with David Gill Gallery, in collaboration with Galleria Continua, when the artist was invited to prepare a new body of site-specific work for London. Over several weeks, José painted various canvases in different formats and colours, created charcoal drawings and sketched the projects of the installations, to be shown as “Tierra Madre (Mother Earth)”.

Mina al aire libre I, 2016. (122x183cm)
Mina al aire libre I, 2016. (122x183cm)
Mina-al-aire-libre-III-2016.-122x183cm.jpg
Mina-al-aire-libre-III-2016.-122x183cm.jpg

The title of the exhibition alludes to the close relationship of the artist’s work with nature, the riches of natural world and the materials it comprises. “Tierra Madre” will consist of a selection of paintings, drawings and installations. Each one of these manifestations, in dialogue with the earth and its components, has inspired the young artist in many diverse ways.

Cancrinita I, 2016. (210x180cm)
Cancrinita I, 2016. (210x180cm)

Yaque’s special way of painting and his interrelation with his materials cause the resulting paintings – some of very large dimensions – to enhance the media he uses, causing an apparent abstraction, with each work taking on a telluric and almost dramatic force. His drawings speak to us of the treasures inside great mining quarries. These “open-air mines”, as he calls them, reveal a relationship with nature, based on the beauty of the most refined stroke. The installations mix natural elements such as earth of different origins, stones, mineral components and recovered books, which are integrated into this substratum, then framed, eventually harbouring a new genesis within each work.

Escorodita-I-2016.-225x160cm
Escorodita-I-2016.-225x160cm

This debut London exhibition serves as a leitmotiv to celebrate a long friendship, through love of art and commitment to young artists, between David Gill Gallery and Galleria Continua. David Gill met José Yaque two years ago in Havana in the company of Lorenzo Fiaschi, one of the founders of Galleria Continua and has since been a supporter of Yaque’s work, now bringing him to London for the first time.

Anabergita-I-2016.-51x415cm
Anabergita-I-2016.-51x415cm
Magnesita-I-2016.-305x405cm
Magnesita-I-2016.-305x405cm

A catalogue has been published to celebrate the occasion. The compilation, printed in two volumes, is divided into one section dedicated to the painting, and the second to the installations and drawings. The paintings shown respond to the period of Yaque’s creations from the end of 2014, beginning with his personal exhibition “Magma”, up to the works created during his residency in London at the behest of David Gill Gallery. The textual material is composed of two interviews realised by the curator Laura Salas Redondo in 2014 and 2016, which also give a timeframe for his work and thoughts, accompanied by a critical text by Elizabeth Pozo Rubio.

Falla en el horizonte V, 2016
Falla en el horizonte V, 2016

www.davidgillgallery.com

David Gill Gallery
2-4 King Street,
London
SW1Y 6QP

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

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Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.