Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

The Holy Birds

The Holy Birds, London’s only restaurant to specialise in poultry, is a unique dining experience inspired by the 1960s London music and art scene. On 23rd January, award-winning entrepreneurs Gerry and Jon Calabrese will be opening the doors of their refurbished restaurant, close to Spitalfields Market. The Holy Birds is the latest addition to the Calabrese House family, which already includes the Hoxton Pony and Wringer + Mangle.

Holy Bird

The Holy Birds occupies two floors, carefully designed with furniture and fittings hand-picked by The Calabrese Brothers themselves and shipped in from all over Europe, all inspired by the 60s Danish Modernist movement. With strong family ties in the East End and the 60s (the time when their father Salvatore first launched his career), The Holy Birds is Gerry and Jon’s dream come true.

Upstairs there is the restaurant, the perfect spot to have a snack, brunch, lunch or dinner from its open plan kitchen seating, underneath the breathtaking Murano glass chandelier. All poultry is free-range and locally sourced; it includes everything from chicken, duck and grouse to wood pigeon, guinea fowl, partridge, quail and pheasant. There are also delicious options for vegetarians, such as Heritage carrots, roasted parsnips, curd & curry oil salad. Or if you don’t fancy a bird, there is always the fish of the day.

Holy Bird

Holy Bird

Downstairs, The Mule Bar is beautifully decorated with a mix of original mid-century furnishings and bespoke design. A state-of-the-art sound system for renowned DJs and one-off live performances provides a soundtrack inspired by the era.

Holy Bird

The extensive menu of authentic cocktails has been specially designed by Salvatore Calabrese, who has collaborated with his sons for the first time to put The Holy Birds firmly on the map of London’s drinking scene: cocktails on offer include the time-honoured Bloody Mary which needs no introduction; The Moscow Mule, a punchy cocktail that dates back to the 1930s and was originally served in a copper mug stamped with a kicking mule to warn of its effect; The Downtown Manhattan which is served in a glass smoked with lavender; and The Negroni Svegliato which is a combination of Salvatore’s two favourites, the classic Negroni and for that morning wake up call – an italian Moka Coffee, with real coffee made with the original 60s vintage art-deco coffee maker.

Holy Bird

Downstairs also features two carefully designed private rooms available for hire – the Negroni Room featuring a lavish solid oak dining table overlooked by a dazzling art-deco lampshade, as well as handpicked furnishings seating up to 12 people, and the Manhattan Room, a beautiful space designed to transport people back to the swinging ‘60s; the perfect space for receptions and drinks parties for up to 45 people.

SEEN recommends that you check out this new gastro-destination for yourselves. It’s in the vibrant area of Spitalfields (just two minutes from Liverpool Street Station), where The Calabrese Brothers have brought together their expertise in mixology, hospitality and events with their own modern day twist to create something truly unique. From the carefully curated menus (devised in collaboration with head chef Ben Berenger) to the 60-strong cocktail list crafted with their father, to the 60s inspired soundtrack and the beautiful hand-picked furnishings that feature throughout, The Holy Birds is a labour of love that will transport you to another age.

Holy Bird


www.theholybirds.com

The Holy Birds
94 Middlesex Street
Spitalfields
London E1 7EZ

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

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Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

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