Categories ArtPosted on

Virtually Real: Art at the Royal Academy

Virtually Real is a unique project that will soon be on display at the Royal Academy of Arts, where visitors are invited to interact, walk through and even over the creations. Three young artists from the Royal Academy Schools have teamed up with Taiwanese technology company HTC to create this very special project of Virtual Reality art that will take place from 12th to 14th January 2017.

Virtually Real is a unique project that will soon be on display at the Royal Academy of Arts, where visitors are invited to interact, walk through and even over the creations. Three young artists from the Royal Academy Schools have teamed up with Taiwanese technology company HTC to create this very special project of Virtual Reality art that will take place from 12th to 14th January 2017.

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RA Schools graduates, Adham Faramawy, and Elliot Dodd, along third-year student Jessy Jetpacks have used the Virtual Reality platform HTC Vive to allow visitors to interact with virtual artworks, experience hundreds of simulated worlds, watch how the artistic process plays out, and even design a personal virtual artwork using Kodon, a 3D-modelling app, and the TiltBrush by Google, a palette that lets visitors paint in virtual 3D space to produce installations that can be moved through and interacted with, and take home as a digital snapshot.

Adham Faramawy
Work in Progress © courtesy of Adham Faramawy
Elliot Dodd
Experiment 1 © courtesy of Elliot Dodd
Jessy Jetpacks
Experiment 1 © courtesy of Jessy Jetpacks

Eliott Dodd said: “The challenge is mostly starting from scratch on something you’ve never used before. It’s like being presented with a new tool that you don’t understand, but there are triggers there that you do understand, kind of intuitive ways of working from using other computer software.”

A virtual reality studio also strips away many of the constraints a traditional artist faces and, in this respect, Eliott Dodd has found his early experiments rather liberating: “There’s a lot of experimenting to do because all the software is in its early conception, early versions. No one quite understands how these drawing softwares are going to end up being used, maybe commercially or in the arts, so everything you’re doing feels quite unknown.”  



“The exciting thing about virtual reality is that for the first time we’re bringing the real world together with the imaginary, or the virtual, world,” says Senior Vice President of Virtual Reality at HTC, Rikard Steiber. “And as you can see here tonight we’re having artists going into the virtual world, create new pieces of art and then we’re going to bring them out of virtual reality into the real world as 3D printed objects – so that’s a world first.”



This project can be explored while DJs turn the Keeper’s House into a dancefloor, with snacks and complimentary drinks on hand. A limited number of tickets is available for ‘Virtually Real’, the Royal Academy’s first project of Virtual Reality art, running from January 12th to the 14th.

Book your tickets here.

Can you imagine Virtually Real? See what it will be like here.

www.royalacademy.org.uk

Royal Academy of Arts
Burlington House
Piccadilly
Mayfair
London
W1J 0BD

Credits

Virtually Real, Royal Academy of Arts and HTC Vive. All images © courtesy of the artist.

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.