Categories DesignPosted on

Gainsborough Get Weaving at the London Transport Museum

Are you tired of Christmas shopping? If you’re near Covent Garden, London Transport Museum is always a great place to learn about the history and heritage of getting around in the capital. SEEN invites you to have a cultural treat this Christmas at this iconic Museum to watch history come alive in the weaving, as Gainsborough takes up residence from the 13th – 17th December in the Museum’s pop-up Designology Studio, as part of a new programme: Weaving Futures.

Are you tired of Christmas shopping? If you’re near Covent Garden, London Transport Museum is always a great place to learn about the history and heritage of getting around in the capital. SEEN invites you to have a cultural treat this Christmas at this iconic Museum to watch history come alive in the weaving, as Gainsborough takes up residence from the 13th – 17th December in the Museum’s pop-up Designology Studio, as part of a new programme: Weaving Futures.

Karen Beauchamp, designer of a new collection from Gainsborough, along with her fabrics, the Gainsborough archives at the Gainsborough Silk Mill.

Weaving Futures is a programme curated by design industry experts Philippa Brock and Samuel Plant Dempsey, that highlights the importance and potential of woven textiles to the London Transport system, using the idea of ‘data’ as a platform. It explores the significance of Jacquard loom weaving beyond textiles, looking at how the Jacquard loom punch card system led to the development of computers and digital data, and how these have affected transport systems as a whole.

Karen Beauchamp, designer of a new collection from Gainsborough, along with her fabrics, at the Gainsborough Silk Mill.

Gainsborough Silk Mill photographed by Alun Callender

The fantastic heritage of London’s transport will be focusing on the extraordinary history of Gainsborough, a company with 100 years of weaving experience, well known for supplying beautiful woven fabrics to royal palaces and stately homes, as well as amazing on-screen costume and set design for the likes of Downton Abbey and Pirates of the Caribbean. Gainsborough’s residency will draw on over a century of creative knowledge and skill to bring the data to life in stunning Jacquard fabric designs. These designs will then be digitally woven into live textile prototypes, for museum visitors to watch, using a state-of-the-art digital Jacquard loom.

Karen Beauchamp, designer of a new collection from Gainsborough, along with her fabrics, the Gainsborough archives at the Gainsborough Silk Mill.

Gainsborough Silk Mill photographed by Alun Callender

The Designology studio and Late Debate series of events, including Weaving Futures, are part of London Transport Museum and Transport for London’s Transported by Design season, which is supported by Exterion Media. The 18-month programme of events and exhibitions explores good design on the transport network, and its role in the lives of the millions of customers who use it every day. For more information on the season and its events, visit www.ltmuseum.co.uk

Gainsborough Weaving
London Transport Museum
Covent Garden Piazza
London
WC2E 7BB

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Categories ArtPosted on

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Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

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Categories DesignPosted on

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