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Treehouse: An Abstract Take on a Traditional Concept

Treehouse is a beautiful, demountable construction designed and built by British architect Scott Kyson, as a playhouse for his children, aged between four and eight. This small garden pavilion is covered in sheets of smoked glass and lined in lengths of charred larch.

Treehouse is a beautiful, demountable construction designed and built by British architect Scott Kyson, as a playhouse for his children, aged between four and eight. This small garden pavilion is covered in sheets of smoked glass and lined in lengths of charred larch.

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The structure, located in the garden of the family’s Epping Forest home, measures just 4.5 metres by 2.7 metres and has an open top. Its main feature is the reflective cladding designed to mirror the surrounding foliage, as well as the house. “The reflections of the smoked mirrored exterior allow the installation to embed itself within its context,” Kyson explained.

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Using a material palette of charred timber and smoked mirrors, the installation explores the raw design principles of form, light and texture. “Treehouse expresses these through a series of juxtaposed contrasts in solid and void, dark and light, rough and smooth,” said Kyson. A series of small blocks of wood, also with charred surfaces, act as casual seating for the structure.

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Rather than building a traditional treehouse, Kyson opted for a demountable construction that means it can be shifted from place to place. The Treehouse was temporarily moved to Shoreditch last month, where it formed the centrepiece of an exhibition celebrating the firm’s 10th anniversary.

“The beauty is more about the process than the end-product” said Kyson, who worked with studio Grain to document the timber-charring process used to create the interior of the structure and its seating.

Watch the short film here: