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The Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is an icon of British culture. Opened in 1871 by Queen Victoria, Prince Albert (Queen Victoria’s husband) originally intended for the hall to be called The Central Hall, and its purpose was to promote the Arts and Sciences. When Prince Albert died in 1861, plans were temporarily halted, until Henry Cole rekindled Prince Albert’s vision. The design is inspired by Roman amphitheatres, a particular love of Cole’s. Queen Victoria renamed the hall in memory of her beloved husband; rumour has it that she was too emotional to speak at the inaugur

The Royal Albert Hall is an icon of British culture. Opened in 1871 by Queen Victoria, Prince Albert (Queen Victoria’s husband) originally intended for the hall to be called The Central Hall, and its purpose was to promote the Arts and Sciences. When Prince Albert died in 1861, plans were temporarily halted, until Henry Cole rekindled Prince Albert’s vision. The design is inspired by Roman amphitheatres, a particular love of Cole’s. Queen Victoria renamed the hall in memory of her beloved husband; rumour has it that she was too emotional to speak at the inauguration.

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The Royal Albert Hall has had an incredible repertoire of performers since its doors opened. The world’s leading figures, in not only music, but also dance, sport and politics, have graced the stage. There are also a number of other performance spaces, presenting an extraordinary schedule throughout the year. During the day it is open for tours of the building.

The grand scale of the auditorium has seen some elaborate performances, from Cirque du Soleil to the London Symphony Orchestra. The Elgar room is a state of the art performance space, on a smaller scale, but don’t be fooled into thinking that the calibre of performance might be less than that of the main auditorium. The likes of Dame Judi Dench and many other legendary acts have performed there.

The Verdi – Italian Kitchen is not only a wonderful restaurant open to the public, and is also the inspirational setting for live music whilst you dine. On Saturdays they host live events during their famous Afternoon Tea schedule, showcasing promising new Opera talent. Sundays see Live Music Brunch and Friday evenings are Free Music nights, though you most still book as the event is popular and seating is limited.

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In addition to the prescribed spaces of the Royal Albert hall, a number of other spaces, like the porches, loading bay and bars often host exhibitions and events. The artistic magic poured into every inch of the Hall have made it one of the most exciting and prestigious venues in the world.

There are also a variety of dining spaces and bars, if, during your visit, shows and exhibitions are booked. It is still well worth dropping in to the Café Bar for a cup of English tea, and simply to experience a venue that is so quintessentially British.

www.royalalberthall.com

The Royal Albert Hall
Kensington Gore
London
SW7 2AP

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