Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

SEEN Loves: #LoveScotch

As part of the mission to bring scotch whisky to younger consumers, the #LoveScotch campaign has established their pop up shop in The Drift Bar and Restaurant on Bishopsgate. At £30 per person, participants will be able to mix their own festive, whisky-based at a special masterclass on 29th November.

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As part of the mission to bring scotch whisky to younger consumers, the #LoveScotch campaign has established their pop up shop in The Drift Bar and Restaurant on Bishopsgate. At £30 per person, participants will be able to mix their own festive, whisky-based at a special masterclass on 29th November.

SEEN and her guest ventured forth on an appropriately drizzly (and therefore Scottish) evening to the welcoming environs of The Drift and sat down in front of beautiful, gleaming cocktail equipment, comprising cocktail shaker (in two sections), strainer, measure and long spoon.

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We were already sipping Scottish Floras (a new take on the Moscow Mule), which were delicious; quite fiery, with a zesty taste of lime. We drank these with Pork & Chorizo Kebabs. The lightness of the cocktail really cut through the meatiness of this canapé. Meanwhile, our master mixologist Douglas Graham-Leigh spoke of the whiskies we would be using: Talisker 10-Year-Old Single Malt, Haig Club, Cardhu Amber Rock, and Johnnie Walker Gold Label Reserve and showed us the cordials and liqueurs that we would be combining the whiskies with; coffee, passionfruit, and lemon.

We made three cocktails in all: Goldmember (a variation on the Pornstar Martini), which was a mixture of Johnnie Walker Gold Reserve, and the sharpness of passionfruit liqueur, which we drank with Smoked Salmon Blinis. The smokiness of the salmon went well with the sharpness of the passionfruit. The Seven Flowers was a twist on the classic Champagne cocktail. We used Haig Club, combined with champagne and lemon liqueur, garnishing it with an edible flower. It was the ideal drink for the Sun-dried Tomato Flatbread that accompanied it; lemon and tomato always being a good combination.

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It was Doug’s firm opinion that a mouthful of ten-year-old whisky should be savoured in the mouth for as ten seconds. Thus it was that he led us all outside into the mild drizzle with a glass of the ten-year-old Talisker in our hands. Holding whisky in your mouth for ten seconds is an experience to be embraced. Afterwards, the mouth tingles and the tastebuds come alive. SEEN will certainly never think of whisky in the same way again.

SEEN’s absolute favourite was the Morning Skye (a variation on the Espresso Martini), made with Talisker and fresh coffee. This was a zesty and eye-popping cocktail. If you shake it properly you even get a cappuccino-style head on it. We accompanied this with Lamb and Smoked Aubergine, the depth of the smoky flavours blending very well with the coffee notes.

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The masterclasses will carry on through to March 2017. It’s an experience that you can take polaroids of and add to the #LoveScotch wall at The Drift (cameras are provided). It’s tremendous fun, convivial and enlightening. And as a fellow participant said to SEEN, with whisky you don’t get a hangover. Perfect for the party season.

Book by contacting The Drift at info@thedriftbar.co.uk or 0845 468 0103

The Drift
Heron Tower
110 Bishopsgate
London
EC2N 4AY

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