Categories ArtPosted on

FLUX: Marta Corada Takes Us Out of Time

SEEN is always looking for the emerging artists of today, on their way to being the big names of tomorrow, and FLUX is the perfect place to find them. FLUX will be showcasing a collection of the most talented painters and sculptors during their third edition, taking place from the 2nd to the 6th November at the iconic art venue, the Old Truman Brewery, in East London.

SEEN is always looking for the emerging artists of today, on their way to being the big names of tomorrow, and FLUX is the perfect place to find them. FLUX will be showcasing a collection of the most talented painters and sculptors during their third edition, taking place from the 2nd to the 6th November at the iconic art venue, the Old Truman Brewery, in East London.

FLUX is an unconventional art event that serves as a platform for contemporary artists to be discovered. This year’s exhibition, carefully curated by founder Lisa Gray, is a unique opportunity to discover work by a diverse group of 140 dynamic artists soon to become players on the international art stage. SEEN particularly favours Marta Corada, a very interesting young Spanish photographer and artist who lives and works in London.

Marta Corada is a visual artist whose documentary work blurs the boundaries between storytelling and fact. Her constructed images are based on documentary photographs of real situations, which are later manipulated by the artist. This approach frees photography from the restrictions of the single exposure, using enduring compositional methods to select characters and visual elements that all exist in the place that we see them – just not all at the same time. In this way, she produces highly considered images from documentary photographs.

Borough Market.
Borough Market.

Her last body of work, Post Memories, was produced in the cities of Shanghai and London, and has been exhibited in venues like the M-50 art district in Shanghai; James Freeman Gallery in London (where Corada exhibits regularly); and Somerset House as part of the National Open Art Competition 2014 show, where she was awarded a photography prize.

Eastbourne Beach.
Eastbourne Beach.

As Marta Corada explains, Post Memories represents documented real moments taken out of time to create scenes that never existed, yet nothing has been added or invented. This contradiction conjures up stories behind each individual, examining the way we perform and interact with each other in different environments, cultures and communities. Our memories and perceptions are challenged forcing us to reassess what we consider real.

Takeaway.
Takeaway.

In the last year she has been experimenting with manual processes, and will unveil a new piece called Picnic Opposite Tate Modern, a photo-montage which includes photography processed with different mediums and cameras, digital editions and manual collage.

Picnic Opposite Tate Modern.
Picnic Opposite Tate Modern.

Marta Corada will be displaying five pieces of work, including an example of street photography. She has also created two small pieces of collage on wood, based on some street-art work she has been doing in London, for FLUX’s new Mini-Masterpieces, where artists present a smaller version than the original, for sale at a fraction of their usual-sized artwork’s value.

FLUX
The Old Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
London
E1 6QL

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.