Categories FashionPosted on

SEEN at the catwalk for LFW16: Christopher Kane SS17

Christopher Kane presented his SS17 collection on day four of London Fashion Week, 19th September, in probably the most artistic London venue on the banks of the River Thames: Tate Britain.

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Once again, Christopher Kane has created a collection distinctly identifiable as his. While styles may routinely change, the Kane signature remains the same: a Christopher Kane collection is immediately recognisable as such. With this new collection proposal, Christopher Kane has challenged his alchemist skills to make Crocs, that most scorned of shoes, into fashionable footwear. Will crocs ever become cool? You bet! In the past, he did it with plastic headscarves, rain-hats and overshoes; now he’s converted Crocs into the new ‘it’ shoe, embellishing them with pieces of DIY precious-looking stones.

This was the most daring feature seen during a show that celebrated Christopher Kane’s tenth birthday in fashion. The collection was a “purposeful clash of clothing cultures in the collection, with the horticultural, the rural, and homemade, contrasted with the sleek, urban, and sophisticated,” according to the press release. Inspired by his childhood and focused on Second World War refugees, “the idea of abandonment” and the “make-do and mend” spirit, as Kane explained backstage; the collection includes Catholic paraphernalia (referencing a Roman Catholic shrine dedicated to Our Lady of Lourdes near his childhood home in Carfin, Scotland), as well as plenty of other past Christopher Kane designs (such as leopard prints, metal rings and bodycon), but pushing them further than ever before.

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Credits

Photography courtesy of London Fashion Week

Seen this week

Categories FashionPosted on

MO-GA: Perfectly Imperfect

As the Sun shines on Earth, so MO-GA’s gender-fluid designs grace the bodies of everyone, rejoicing in ambiguity. Multiple sleeves and feathers recall the animal kingdom in all its glorious diversity; it’s a new aesthetic.

Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

Cocktails at the General Store

SEEN is tireless in her cocktail research, and very much enjoyed travelling to Highbury last week to try The General Store’s new summer cocktail menu and to check out the new interior. She was delighted to sample a Honey Mimosa, very sweet and fruity and just the ticket after a hot journey. It was, as its name suggests, a Mimosa with just a touch of honey.

Categories ArtPosted on

Canaletto: A Drawing Workshop with Alexandra Blum

SEEN has long been an admirer of Alexandra Blum’s liminal and apocalyptic renderings of London’s urban spaces, in which the capital seems ever-changing. It is the artist’s job to capture not only space but the passage of time itself.

Categories MusicPosted on

Rock the Strand is Back Thursday 27th July

One of SEEN’s favourite live music events, Rock the Strand, returns to Strand Palace Hotel on Thursday 27th July for a summer showcase featuring a stellar line-up of talented artists. Curated by industry mogul Tony Moore, Rock the Strand is a free music night that showcases an eclectic range of genres from indie alt-folk to country from emerging new talent and established acts, highlighting the UK’s varied and diverse musical landscape.

Categories GuidePosted on

Love Hunt at the British Museum

SEEN had the pleasure (pun intended) of being invited to a ‘Love Hunt’ at the British Museum. The museum, founded in 1753, is committed to preserving art, culture and history, and has collected around 8 million objects. These artefacts come from every corner of the world, revealing a fragment of many significant moments in time, from Mesopotamia to the Vikings; from the Inuits to the Indians. So, when one embarks on a visit to the world famous British Museum, where does one start?