Categories DesignPosted on

Type Tasting: Do We Judge a Wine by its Label?

As part of the London Design Festival, typography expert and Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman is refreshingly keen to make typefaces accessible to all, raising awareness of how labels are constructed to tempt us to their contents. She has teamed up with Laithwaite’s wines to create a unique experience for Londoners interested in design and drinking fine wines.

Drink Me

As part of the London Design Festival, typography expert and Type Tasting founder Sarah Hyndman is refreshingly keen to make typefaces accessible to all, raising awareness of how labels are constructed to tempt us to their contents. She has teamed up with Laithwaite’s wines to create a unique experience for Londoners interested in design and drinking fine wines.

TypeTasting_Type&Wine3

SEEN was fortunate to attend just such an experience in the delightfully cool brick-lined Laithwaite’s shop in Borough Market. It was the perfect environment for just such an exploration, with only the rumble of trains overhead to remind us that we were in the heart of the city on the South Bank.

It was a friendly and inclusive event with Sarah and Grant Hedley (Laithwaite’s wine tasting expert) putting us at our ease at once. We were all given glasses of delicious wine to sip, games and observations to try around the psychology of fonts and, of course, invited to enjoy ourselves.

tasting wheel

It was certainly an eye-opener to SEEN to realise that so much of what we taste is influenced by our other senses. Clearly we are more suggestible than we think. The wines, were delicious, ranging from the light summeriness of Prosecco to the intensity of the reds. The whole evening was down-to-earth with none of the pretentious stuffiness that sometimes surrounds wine-tasting. SEEN puts this down to Sarah and Grant’s passion for typeface and wine. When someone can communicate their passion to you in such a genuine way, then you stop worrying about what you don’t know and realise exactly how much you do know, by understanding your subconscious reactions.

Sniff game

Sarah’s first book, Why Fonts Matter, was published earlier this year by Penguin/Random House. She is in the process of writing two more books and collaborates with the Crossmodal Research Laboratory, Oxford University. SEEN recommends that you try Sarah’s workshops and sample the wines. You won’t ever look at typeface in quite the same way again.

Wine & Type Tasting Evenings
Thursday 22nd and Tuesday 27th September
7.30 – 9.30pm
£30
www.londondesignfestival.com

Laithwaite’s
Arch 219 – 221
Stoney Street
London
SE1 9AA
www.laithwaites.co.uk

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Categories ArtPosted on

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