Categories ArtPosted on

Lydia Kasumi: Paper Magician

SEEN attended a paper-folding workshop recently and made a cracker for Christmas in which we could place a gift. The cracker was designed by the talented Lydia Kasumi, who creates the most remarkable paper designs for a host of clients.

SEEN attended a paper-folding workshop recently and made a cracker for Christmas in which we could place a gift. The cracker was designed by the talented Lydia Kasumi, who creates the most remarkable paper designs for a host of clients.

At once quirky and playful, yet the epitome of clean lines and accuracy, Lydia’s work straddles the divide between the recyclable, yet eminently treasurable objet: never mind the product her work is displaying, it’s the paper architecture that captures the imagination. Trainers, laptops, taps even… The viewer is left wondering: how does she do that?

Lydia has worked for Adidas, De Beers, Lush and Vogue UK, amongst many others. Even if you don’t know her name, SEEN bets you’ve spotted her work. From the geometric to the curvilinear, Lydia’s attention to detail fools the eye even as it delights the senses.

HIVE mac copy

retouch

SEEN was intrigued to know how Lydia came to this career.

How did you start paper engineering?

Almost by accident! I studied Fine Art at Uni and became intrigued by sculpture, then after I graduated I did some paper experiments, put them online and got a lot of interest. When I moved to London I got picked up by an agency and realised it might actually be a viable career.

What inspires you?

Too much – architecture, artists, a book I’m reading, a shadow on a wall, a pile of rubbish on the street, nature, exhibitions, shoes, textiles, furniture, my peers… If I’m in a receptive mood, I’ll consume every kind of visual I can and something, usually unexpected, will start to take shape in my mind.

What’s your favourite thing to do in London, in relation to your skill?

Taking a break from the pace of things and regaining some perspective is important, so I try to go places to find some breathing space and inspiration, like the V&A. It has a lovely calming, grand feeling to it.

lydiakasumi.com

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.