Categories ArtPosted on

Lydia Kasumi: Paper Magician

SEEN attended a paper-folding workshop recently and made a cracker for Christmas in which we could place a gift. The cracker was designed by the talented Lydia Kasumi, who creates the most remarkable paper designs for a host of clients.

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SEEN attended a paper-folding workshop recently and made a cracker for Christmas in which we could place a gift. The cracker was designed by the talented Lydia Kasumi, who creates the most remarkable paper designs for a host of clients.

At once quirky and playful, yet the epitome of clean lines and accuracy, Lydia’s work straddles the divide between the recyclable, yet eminently treasurable objet: never mind the product her work is displaying, it’s the paper architecture that captures the imagination. Trainers, laptops, taps even… The viewer is left wondering: how does she do that?

Lydia has worked for Adidas, De Beers, Lush and Vogue UK, amongst many others. Even if you don’t know her name, SEEN bets you’ve spotted her work. From the geometric to the curvilinear, Lydia’s attention to detail fools the eye even as it delights the senses.

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SEEN was intrigued to know how Lydia came to this career.

How did you start paper engineering?

Almost by accident! I studied Fine Art at Uni and became intrigued by sculpture, then after I graduated I did some paper experiments, put them online and got a lot of interest. When I moved to London I got picked up by an agency and realised it might actually be a viable career.

What inspires you?

Too much – architecture, artists, a book I’m reading, a shadow on a wall, a pile of rubbish on the street, nature, exhibitions, shoes, textiles, furniture, my peers… If I’m in a receptive mood, I’ll consume every kind of visual I can and something, usually unexpected, will start to take shape in my mind.

What’s your favourite thing to do in London, in relation to your skill?

Taking a break from the pace of things and regaining some perspective is important, so I try to go places to find some breathing space and inspiration, like the V&A. It has a lovely calming, grand feeling to it.

lydiakasumi.com

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Categories FashionPosted on

Colour Smudging by Hare and Bone

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Categories NewsPosted on

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Categories Food&DrinkPosted on

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Categories ArtPosted on

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