Categories FashionPosted on

TRAID – a Fashion Activist’s Guide

SEEN has always been a big fan of Traid – THE ethical charity fashion shop. Traid has been at the forefront of changing consumer habits with regard to purchasing – and crucially – how consumers dispose of their clothes and accessories.

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SEEN has always been a big fan of Traid – THE ethical charity fashion shop. Traid has been at the forefront of changing consumer habits with regard to purchasing – and crucially – how consumers dispose of their clothes and accessories.

They combine this with a proper concern and financial aid for the garment workers of the Third world. From educating the children of garment workers to helping farmers grow eco-friendly pesticidal plants, Traid collaborates with NGOs working abroad to make their ideals a reality. Go into any one of Traid’s stores (or check out the website) and pick up leaflets on the initiatives they support.

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Traid also champions the work done by fashion activists such as Tansy Hoskins (Stitched Up). Many leading lights in the world of fashion and journalism are in the vanguard of change. Many, like Olivia Pinnock (The Fashion Debates) believe that the consumer can make a difference in holding fashion manufacturers to account for their business practices at home and abroad.

Traid also run workshops that help customers of all ages to engage with sewing skills, in order to mend and re-purpose garments rather than let them go to landfill. SEEN attended an excellent Plastic Seconds workshop last year, in which we used bottle tops, pen caps and assorted plastic items to create jewellery that was at once wearable and striking.

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Traid also has its own unique label – Traidremade. The current 80s trend is represented by ‘Rights of Massive’ collection in partnership with Alex Noble, which only uses waste textiles but NEVER exploitative labour.

High street brands Asos and Doddle have recently teamed with Traid to help consumers reuse their clothes. If you feel like committing yourself to making your clothes purchases mainly secondhand, then feel free to tweet @traid a picture of your own unique secondhand style!

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Traid is passionate about community outreach. The latest event takes place on June 23rd. Entitled ‘Repair in the Community’, the workshop will focus on the forgotten art of repair and improving our relationship with ‘stuff’. Interestingly, Traid will be sharing a community space provided by Ziferblat London. They are proponents of a Russian concept of a pay-per-minute friendly space that encourages participants to create, collaborate and play.

If you have garments, shoes and accessories to throw out, bring them in-store to Traid or book a collection. Traid also have banks where you can drop off your unwanted items. Traid have lifted the whole concept of charity shopping to new heights and made other charities raise their high street game as well – not least in how they dress their windows. Fans of Traid’s very own visual merchandiser Francesco Colucci include iconic London artists Gilbert and George. Come and be part of the movement towards a sustainable life for everyone involved in the life of clothes.

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To do this brilliant work, Traid needs your donations of unwanted clothes and shoes. We only ask that they are in good enough condition to resell in our charity shops. Drop into a Traid shop to donate the things you no longer want, drop into a Traid clothes bank or book a home collection.

www.traid.org.uk

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Categories ArtPosted on

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