Categories MusicPosted on

GLASS

We started out as The Hall Of Mirrors, but then over the last couple of years our sound and style evolved into something totally different, and so GLASS was born. It’s a nod to our roots but it reflects who we are now. Also we like snazzy single-word names that look nice.

Why the name GLASS?

We started out as The Hall Of Mirrors, but then over the last couple of years our sound and style evolved into something totally different, and so GLASS was born. It’s a nod to our roots but it reflects who we are now. Also we like snazzy single-word names that look nice.

How would you say your journey as a singer/songwriter began? 

Jessica: I began playing the piano from quite a young age, out of boredom from having dodgy hips. A lot of the time I couldn’t move from the waist down, so I’d spend a lot of time at the piano keeping myself entertained. I first wrote a proper song when my Mum and Dad split up when I was around 14 years old, and never looked back.

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Who is your biggest musical influence?

Jessica: They change quite often but right now Kyary Pamyu Pamyu – she seems so cool.
Scott: At the moment it’s probably Death Grips or Robert Wyatt.

For those who have never heard your music, describe your sound in 3 words

Cry And Dance (CRANCE).

Which of your songs is your personal favourite and why?

Jessica: Out of the three we have released, ‘Broken Bones’ is my favourite as it was born out of a traumatic experience with my brother, so it will always mean more to me than the others. It’s not my favourite of the unreleased songs though. Watch out for ‘Where On Earth’ – that’s my actual favourite!

Scott: Our first single ‘What It Is To Believe’, because it’s like the first child who has to watch the newer babies getting all the attention.

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Has there been one particular moment in your musical career that you’re most proud of?

Getting our songs played on Radio 1 was a very proud moment. From writing a song in a room – or in our case a shed at the back of a garden – to suddenly hearing it on one of the biggest radio stations in the world was such a weird and wonderful feeling.

Are there any established artists in your area you’d like to work with?

It’s difficult to say, we have a strong aesthetic which we try and keep a tight hold of, and collaborations often seem to end up with something not quite as good as either of those two elements in isolation! We’re more keen to work with people outside of our area, like filmmakers and dancers…

What do you think about being an emerging singer in 2016 in the UK?

It’s a good time to be in music, despite what many people say. Obviously it’s hard to make any money now, and there’s a huge amount of bands and artists all trying to stand out from the crowd, but there are also so many more opportunities to get your music to people without the mechanics of the old industry, which appears to be dying on its arse.

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One final question… As SEEN magazine is about art, architecture, culture, music, fashion, gastronomy, shopping and entertainment, what are your personal recommendations of what to do in London by day and by night?

A day spent riding the DLR to its furthest reaches, or walking the length of Regent’s Canal is a day well spent. Vinyl Deptford is a great record shop with homemade food from a lovely man called Bertie. They have great live music also, and if you’re staying out late, The Bunker Club round the corner is amazing.

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.