Categories ArtPosted on

Lights of Soho: The revival of neon

As part of the Save Soho movement, Lights of Soho art gallery is bringing back the colorful, old school Soho, that funky side of London that used to be filled with neon light signs back in the day.

Just a few months ago, Lights of Soho opened and soon became London’s leading light art gallery and member’s club that certaintly brings a new light to one of London’s most famous art hubs.
This new venue welcomes the creative community and all londoners to a new, or better yet, revived version of what it used to be in the 70‘s, when the late neon artist Chris Bracey started his career and turned Soho into a world of colorful lights, taking the expression “sex sells” to a new level, he went from shop to shop offering his work and created neon light signs that remain in soho until this day.
Allocated in 35 brewer st, what used to be a brothel and a sex shop during the 70‘s, is now a mix of art gallery, cafe and bar, the perfect combination for millenials that want to stop by and enjoy a light bite or a drink while getting that retro feeling given by all the neon lights that cover the walls, and a touch of house music in the background to remind us that it is still 2015.
Composed of two levels, at the entrance there is a wide lounge that welcomes customers from 11am til 6pm, people working in the area also choose this spot to sit down and work on their laptops while eating snacks from the bar.
Downstairs, the basement has more of a bar kind of vibe, it is open to members only, mainly artists from the neighbourhood, and there are separate spaces that can be reserved for those who want to sit for a drink after 6 at a private table, but the neon light artwork never ends, every corner is filled with colour, even the toilet has a piece of neon artwork, also a secret staircase that leads to nowhere, but its all about the fun of being in an old traditional English building that has kept its structure but added a touch of modernism.

The current exhibit “God’s own junkyard is just proof of what this place means to Soho, Chris Bracey’s family, including his wife Linda, who worked with the artist for the last 40 years, along with Chris’ son Marcus and the couple’s middle son, Matthew, have gathered some of Bracey’s work and also their own to make this exhibit. Chris and Linda’s grandchildren, Amber and Charlie, also feature their artwork.

Gods own junkyard is a family business that started out with Chris Brace’s father, Dick, and has now became iconic in a city like London, in the familys own words they are “designers and makers of all things with light”. During his career, “the neon man”, Chris Bracey, created art for names like David LaChapelle and Martin Creed, his work was also featured in movies like Stanley Kubrick’s “Eyes Wide Shut”, Tim Burton’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Batman”.

girl girls girls

i love sex

kiss

money for nothing

take on me

Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs
Linda, Marcus, Matthew and Amber from gods own junkyard / electro signs

35 Brewer St
London W1F 0RX
020 7183 2003
www.lightsofsoho.com

Seen this week

Categories DesignPosted on

Sculpture in the City, Art for Everyone

SEEN thoroughly enjoyed a preview of the 18 new artworks around the financial district’s square mile. Set up by The City of London in 2010, this excellent initiative expands its footprint every year, improving the area and proving that when people are happy, they work better.

Categories ArtPosted on

Alex Evans at the Foundry Gallery, Chelsea Quarter: LDF17

The astute reader will have noticed that SEEN loves art about London. There are many artists in this city who draw (pun intended) their inspiration from it, none more so than Alex Evans whose fractal renderings hint at the entropic nature of urban life and perhaps also our anxieties and isolation in the 21st century. His latest exhibition ‘Invisible Systems’ can be seen at the Foundry Gallery, tucked away off the King’s Road until 26th October.